Diving & Dive sites

More than 45 superb dive sites, strewn all over Menorca, are waiting to be discovered. Caves, caverns, vertical drop offs and coral encrusted reefs offer a wide variety of marine life. All viewed through 30 metres/ 100 feet of crystal clear visibility.



Son Bou Scuba is one of the few dive centres that have special permission to dive the Marine Reserve on the North coast of Menorca, with an abundance of protected fish life.


Daily schedule

Every morning we meet in the dive centre at around 09:30, departure is at approximately 10:00. When you’re diving for the first time with us it’s recommended to do your registration one day before. For this you need to bring your certification card and logbook.
Padi Medical StatementPlease be aware that a current medical certificate and diving insurance are required by law for diving in Spain. If you do not have proof of an insurance against decompression sickness, we can offer you a daily or monthly insurance at moderate cost.

Usually we organize a so-called ‘Two-Tank Dive’ every morning: two dives with a 45-minute surface interval in between. For the participants we provide a small snack and a soft drink or water. We aim to be back in the dive centre at around 14:30. Like this, you can spend the afternoon exploring the island or being with your family. The afternoon is used for training sessions and academics. Night dives are available upon request (minimum 4 divers).

The majority (about 80%) of our daily diving trips are shore dives by mini-van. We dive all around the island, with an average 20 minutes drive time. Like this, we can show you the best dive sites Menorca has to offer, not just a sandy cove in the vicinity, covered in Poseidon grass. Also, when diving conditions are not favourable on one side of the island, we can dive the opposite side. This gives us the advantage that we do not have to depend on the sea or the weather and thus cancel a day’s diving.
Apart from the Marine Reserve we have 14 caves and caverns in our program –including the famous ‘Pont d’en Gil Cavern’- as well as several wrecks like the ‘Ocean Diver’ and the ‘Malakoff’.

There are a couple of famous dive sites that require a boat to enable you to get to them. For this, we have a 4.5 metre Zodiac (5 divers) available. For larger groups we use charter boats; a 6.5 metre RIB for 8 divers or a hard boat for 10 divers. We always guide our own customers so that the Son Bou Scuba service stays with you. Of course we carry spare parts, emergency oxygen and a First Aid kit in the vans and on the boat, as well as communications equipment.

Full-day excursions

Once a week -or upon request- we organize full-day excursions to the highlights of Menorca: the ‘Malakoff Wreck’ or ‘Pont d’en Gil Cavern’ (minimum 4 divers). During the full-day trip you have the possibility to make 2 - 3 different dives. The full-day excursion is subject to an extra charge of Euro 30. Departure from the dive centre is at 08:30, and we aim to be back around 16:30. Requests to dive other dive sites around the island are always welcome.

Dive sites

Menorca’s dive sites have something to offer for every experience level, from ‘beginner’ to ‘very experienced’ (in case of diving some of the caves and deep wrecks). Although most of the caverns and caves on Menorca are not difficult to dive in, we understand that it’s not everybody’s cup-of-tea. Please do not enter any overhead environment when you do not feel comfortable to do so and let your dive guide know. The difference between “cave” and “cavern” is, when diving a cavern we can see the entrance (exit) at all times. Not so in a cave. In most caverns on Menorca it is possible to surface within, so you do not always need to be ‘very experienced’ to join us.
Currents are generally nonexistent near the coast, but we might find them when diving from the boat, further out to sea.

The asterisks' below indicate the difficulty of the dive sites:

* = easy, ** = intermediate, *** = difficult, **** = technical dive.







Arena *
The Belltower **
Bullring ****
Cagaires (Isla D'el Aire) **
Cala Morts *
Calascoves *
Cala Viola (Marine Parc) *
Caló de Rafalet *
Cap de Cavalleria (Marine Parc) *
La Catedral (Cap d’En Font) **
Cuevas de Cala En Porter *
Diver’s Playground *
East End *
Es Caló Blanco *
Es Caragol *
Faro D’Artrutx *
Fossil Cave ***
"Francesquita" Wreck ****
"Francina" Wreck *
"Georgia K." Wreck ****
Grand Grotto ***
Horse Shoe ***
Illa de Ses Àligues **
Illa des Porros (Marine Parc) *
Islotes de Binibela *
Labyrinth *
Macaret Point *
"Malakoff" Wreck ***
Mike’s Place **
Moon Pool ***
"Ocean Diver" Wreck **
Organ Loft ***
Pont d’En Gil *
Punta d’En Falet *
Punto Favorito **
The Rock *
S’Algar Funnels **
S’Algar Gardens *
Sa Roca Fondo *
Scorpion Cave ****
Seven Arches *
Slipway *
Swiss Cheese **
Sunken City Son Bou Playa *
Three Arches (S’Algar) **
Waterfall-Grotto *
West End Reef (Isla D'el Aire) **
West Point *

A selection of our most popular dive sites:

The Belltower **

This cavern, also known as ‘Tom‘s Belfry’, is considered as one of the best dives in the Cap d’en Font area. We have the choice to enter the Belltower through two different entrances, leading into a large chamber that penetrates deep into the rocky shore of Cap d’en Font. This chamber leads to a large air pocket, where we make our safety stop around a stalagmite that nearly reaches the surface. While floating on the surface we admire the display of stalactites. The Belltower is connected with the Organ Loft, a cave that should only be dived by very experienced divers due to its low ceiling and sandy bottom.

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Calascoves *

Calascoves is Menorca’s most important Necropolis from Talayotic times. The cliffs surrounding this cove give place to almost a hundred man-made caves used for burying the dead around 900 BC. In Punic times the cove was used for anchoring boats. Although an archeological excavation of the seabed has taken place in the seventies it is not rare to discover large pieces of pottery and cookware. Lots of octopus and stingrays can be seen over the sandy parts.

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Cala Viola (Marine Parc) *

Starts off in a sheltered bay around 6 metres deep which is usually full of small fish and an occasional stingray. Following the reef round to the left can be found the remains of a large sailing boat at around 14-18 metres deep. The remains of this wreck are scattered around over a large area and provide excellent photo opportunities.
When we continue to follow the reef to the left, in front of a Spanish bunker dating from the Civil War, usually a large group of resident barracudas can be spotted.

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Cuevas de Cala En Porter *

Another sheltered bay and one of our primary training sites. Cala en Porter has a nice sandy beach, a few local bars and toilets and showers. A maximum depth of 14 metres can be found towards the end of the bay. A rocky reef runs down the left and right side of the bay with sand along the centre. The more experienced divers can visit several caverns on the right hand side, in which it is possible to surface and have a view of the bay. Several pipefish inhabit the area and can be found between the sea-grass.

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Diver’s Playground *

Massive rocks and boulders, combined with a drop-off guarantee an outstanding dive. A multitude of swim-thrus, tunnels and small but impressive caves litter this site and give home to moray eels, octopus, colorful snails and sometimes even a seahorse! An ideal site for macro-photography, with plenty to explore. As many divers have told us; “one dive is not enough to see it all.” Depth: 18-72 feet/ 6-22 m.

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Es Caló Blanco *

Ideal site for beginners and Open Water students, with easy access. The mooring blocks scattered around are home to cuttlefish and octopus. Sandy-bottomed seabed with rocks, gradually sloping down. Sheltered from most winds.

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Faro D’Artrutx *

Usually done as a repetitive dive after diving the “Malakoff” wreck. Underneath this lighthouse, close to Cala´n Bosch, we can find an abundance of marine life as well as an amazing scenery. In May, this site is known to be a mating place for stingrays. Although year after year less stingrays are spotted, it is still worth a visit.

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Fossil Cave ***

Another attraction on Menorca’s south coast. At the back of an overhang, at a depth of 14 metres, we can find the letterbox-entrance to this cave. At the end of this 100-feet / 30-m. long cave is a small air pocket where we surface through a freshwater halocline. It has gotten its name due to the fossils that can be found in its ceiling. On the way out we search for the two large conger-eels that live here. A truly breathtaking dive. Unfortunately only suitable for very experienced divers, because the cave entrance is not visible all the way.

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"Francesquita" Wreck ****

A 437-ton Spanish coastal steamer, sunk in December 1952 during a storm. Today she stands upright on her keel on a flat, silt-free bottom at 164 feet / 50 m. depth and is still in near perfect condition. Well-known for the quantity of marine life, the considerable depth of this wreck represents an attraction for some exceptionally large fish, both pelagic (open sea) and benthic (bottom dwelling) species. A superb deep wreck dive.

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"Francina" Wreck *

Large Dutch merchant ship (1,500-ton), loaded with chemicals on its way to Algiers, sunk in 1974 after an explosion in the aft hold. Remains start at only 6 metres of water in a remote rocky cove under dramatic soaring cliffs. Her massive engine blocks, anchors, chains and plates are scattered over the rock bottom right across the cove down to some 20m. Although well broken up, this is a superb wreck for photographers and wreckies, and can be enjoyed by divers of all levels of experience.

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"Georgia K." Wreck ****

Greek-owned 2,144-ton cargo ship, loaded with iron bars and 60 tons of bunker oil, sunk in 1992 during heavy seas. Plenty of scope for penetration and exploration on this wreck for technical divers. Its remaining lifeboat is lying upside down on top of the cargo of iron bars which can be seen through the open deck hatches. Depth: 230-318 feet / 70–97 metres.

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Grand Grotto ***

Following a drop-off, we reach Grand Grotto through an opening which extends itself from 16 to 30 metres. Once inside, we have the choice to follow a tunnel to the left or to continue straight ahead. Surfacing is possible in either direction, but the left side is the best to visit. Here it is possible to take off the BCD and the cylinder and walk around while admiring the stalactites. When doing both routes, divers should make sure to keep an eye on their computer because of multiple ascents.

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Horse Shoe ***

The Horse Shoe is a tunnel with a 90 degree angle that also serves as a shortcut when on our way to the Moon Pool. After the wide entrance it gets narrower and ends in a chimney. When swimming up, make sure to search the ceiling for shrimps and small slipper lobsters. After reaching the ceiling of the chimney we can see the exit of the tunnel.

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La Catedral (Cap d’En Font) **

Stunning cavern dive with a huge opening. Largest cavern on the South coast, probably the largest in Menorca. When surfacing within, we can switch of our dive lights because enough natural light comes through the entrance. Stalactites can be seen 18 feet / 6 m. above our heads. Surely one of the best dives available on Menorca. Maximum depth about 66 feet/ 20 m.

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Macaret Point *

The typical steep cliffs of Menorca’s north coast continue here under water, forming a superb underwater landscape. Decorative and dramatic arches and swim-thrus, ideal photo opportunity because of its abundant fish life. Excellent shore dive if the weather is poor in the South. Depth: 33–96 ft./ 10–29 m.

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"Malakoff" Wreck ***

In bad weather, the ocean-going, French-owned cargo steamer ‘Malakoff’ hit a submerged rock formation in January 1929 and sank within only 7 minutes. Today this famous wreck stands upright on a sandy bottom at some 130 ft. / 40 m. depth, the deck level being at 105 ft. / 32 m. In the Fifties, all of the ship’s structures above deck level have been blown up by salvage divers. Nowadays, the ‘Malakoff’ forms a fully colonized artificial reef some 105 metres long, home to an outstanding fish life and attracting many deep-water pelagics. Shoals of resident barracudas, conger eels, groupers and some rare species of triggerfish can be seen. Quite often ceramic tiles or china porcelain, still hidden in its remains, can be found.

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Moon Pool ***

A cave dive for experienced divers. Following a superb wall, we reach the large entry of Moon Pool at a depth of about 43 ft. / 13 m., leading to a corridor that twists its way some 100 ft. / 30 m. into the shore of Cap d’en Font. Following the corridor, paved by worn round boulders, we reach a semi-circular wall. After passing through a freshwater halocline we surface into a small air pocket – the Moon Pool. On our way out, we look for conger eel ‘Billy’ and shrimps, which can be found here in large quantities.

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"Ocean Diver" Wreck **

Small Dutch cargo vessel, some 76 ft./ 23 metres in length. Last used for tobacco smuggling between several Mediterranean ports and North Africa, and eventually confiscated by the Spanish Coast Guard. After several years of rusting in the harbour of Mahón, the ‘Ocean Diver’ was sunk to establish an artificial reef. Directly in front of the dive centre, the ‘Ocean Diver’ stands upright at 89 ft./ 27 m. depth, forming a habitat for groupers and snails.

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Pont d’En Gil *

World-class cavern dive (722 ft./ 220 m. long), definitely the best of the Western Mediterranean. Filled with stunning displays of stalagmites and stalactites and a clear surface virtually all the way, this cavern is also suitable for novice divers. The entrance to this cavern is at only 40 ft./ 12 m. After a short swim we surface inside in a huge, air filled dome. Once inside, divers have the possibility to surface throughout the dive to admire the giant stalactites hanging from the ceiling. It is even possible to discover Pont d’En Gil whilst snorkeling. At the end of the cavern, we reach a small beach where we can sit and share our impressions and thoughts.

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S’Algar Funnels **

Two spectacular caverns, one on top of the other, connected by a tunnel. The upper cavern, with its entrance just 26 ft./ 8 m. deep, leads to a chimney into the rocky shore of S’Algar. Descending through a passage we can swim from the upper cave into an almost enclosed chamber, leading off into another passage that gives way into the lower cavern. The arched entrance of this second cavern is so large that it is naturally lit. Maximum depth inside the cavern: 85 ft./ 26 m. Outside the reef slopes down to over 115 ft./ 35 m.

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Sa Roca Fondo *

A sheltered cove, rich with a constantly changing variety of aquatic life. The sandy bottom and Neptune grass play home to clams and starfish. In early summer, a large group of barracudas can be seen. In the sandy areas we frequently see stingrays skulking around. An easy entry from a small platform into 1-2 m of water puts us straight on top of smooth rocks and boulders. Moving further out to sea the shoals of fish tend to increase in size. On the return there are plenty of nooks and crannies to investigate. Due to the pottery that still can be found, we know that in ancient times, boats have anchored in this bay.

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Scorpion Cave ****

This cave at Cap d’en Font is hardly known and much less explored. After entering, in a small chamber to the right, a restriction in the bottom shows a tunnel which is believed to continue for 120 metres or more. In 2011-2012 we plan to dive this cave with side-mounted cylinders.

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Seven Arches *

The general topography on this dive is hard to beat. Swim through an underwater labyrinth of swim-thrus and channels which snake through the reef; all open and well lit from above. No two routes are the same. Lots of nooks and crannies to investigate. A fantastic photo opportunity. Depth around 14 metres.

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Slipway *

Small cove near Cala en Blanes, around 6 – 10 m. deep which is full of octopus and an occasional barracuda. At the end of the cove we will come across an impressive drop-off down to 18-25m deep. Following the reef round to the left can be found a series of large rocks and boulders, which form an interesting set of swim thrus for the journey back into the cove. To the right we swim through an impressive canyon. At around 24 metres pieces of pottery from an ancient shipwreck can be found.

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Organ Loft ***

Only for very experienced divers, because the bottom of this cave consists of very fine sand. Combined with a ceiling of only 2 - 3 metres in height, a false movement with a fin reduces the visibility to zero. It should be dived with a reel for safety reasons. A large number of stalagmites and stalactites shows that thousands of years ago, this cave has been above sea level.

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Swiss Cheese **

Hollow reef on Menorca’s north coast with a maze of tunnels, chimneys and letter boxes to meander your way in and out. Certainly one of Menorca’s most famous sites and a ‘must’ for every rock wriggler. A 150 ft. / 50 m. long path leads to the entry- and exit point. On the way to the large entrance of this cavern, at some 66 ft. / 20 m. depth, we are escorted by barracudas. Sometimes even a cormorant can be seen under water! North of the entrance, at a depth of about 30 metres, is a sandy area where white gorgonians can be seen. Also it’s possible to spot stingrays sleeping on the sand. Inside Swiss Cheese we can see scorpion fish, crabs and some conger eels, in spring also slipper lobsters.

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Sunken City – Son Bou Playa *

The remains of this city can be explored some 400 feet from the beach. The former church of this city (Basilica de Son Bou, 500 B.C.) can still be seen on the beach. Often we can see small stingrays and octopus, as well as barracudas. With a bit of luck, pottery and amphorae dating from Roman times can be found under the sand. On the way back, swim along the eastern wall and enjoy the swim-thrus. It has an average depth of 26 ft./ 8 m. A shallow dive, but an excellent opportunity to refresh your diving skills or to try out your new equipment.

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Waterfall-Grotto *

This small cavern is considered an insider-tip, because only few dive centres know about its existence. Through a wide crack at 23 feet/ 7 metres we reach a small air filled pocket. No stalactites here, but when we switch off our dive lights, we can see the daylight enter through the opening into the cavern. A truly amazing experience and an easy start to get comfortable with Menorca’s caves and caverns.

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West End Reef **

A reef leading out from the western tip of the Isla D'el Aire, where the remains of ancient shipwrecks can be found by excavating in the sand. The reef itself has several small caverns and is a good spot to see groupers and schools of barracudas.

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